Skip to main content

About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
MSNBCW 11
CNNW 4
CNN 2
MSNBC 2
KPIX (CBS) 1
WUSA (CBS) 1
LANGUAGE
English 28
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
they do. we should distinguish those two. >> with israel and egypt, the blockade is very vague. they are being negotiated today. there's an agreement to negotiate things about them, which are continuing today in cairo. they may be temporary. they may be very, very limited and they may never materialize at all. what hamas has gained is, first of all, a certain diplomatic breakthrough. while it was going on, the prime minister of egypt went there, the foreign minister of turkey went there. what hamas has been able to do is -- >> international recognition. >> yeah. break out of its diplomatic cage a bit. that's the benefit. the other thing, this is a benefit to the people, the hamas people in gaza, fighting an internal power with the external leadership that used to be in damascus and is now dispursed all over the place. they achieved things for themselves. the people of gaza maybe in a sense of euphoria, but there's a sense of hangover. there ought to be, as there was, after cass led in 2008 and 2009, a clear contrast with a better situation. today there isn't one. that's the tra
's going on with egypt, the united states annually gives roughly $2 billion to egypt and something that senator graham made clear over the weekend is to remind egypt everyone is watching their steps. >> egypt, watch what you do and how you do it. you're teetering with the congress on having your aid cut off if you keep inciting violence between the israelis and the palestinians. >> so is this a big test for morsi to prove not only that they are a partner to the united states, but an ally moving forward? >> well, they have been a treaty ally since '79. there's roughly $2 billion in aid given to egypt every year. $2 billion isn't quite what it used to be. so if this is the one piece of leverage that we have over egypt, that's not going to work. what we -- >> even in an economy that's totally failing and upside down for egypt, it's -- $2 billion is not an incentive to want to play nice? >> i don't think that it is the only factor that will get mohamed morsi to be an honest broker in the region. i think it's much -- it would be a much better bet to appeal to his sense of wanting to be
leadership and leadership in egypt to try and come up with a truce, one that she describes as being durable. shannon? >> shannon: we'll talk more with the panel about that, david. thank you. the violence in the middle east is stealing thunder from president obama's asian visit and interrupting outgoing secretary of state hillary clinton's farewell tour. here is chief white house correspondent ed henry. >> secretary of state hillary clinton plunged right in to the last minute shuttle diplomacy. rushing from campodea to jerusalem. to meet with israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu. >> america's commitment to israel's security is rock solid. and unwavering. that is why we believe it is essential to deescalate the situation in gaza. >> after a short rest, clinton will now head to ramallah early wednesday to meet with palestinian president mahmoud abbas. before flying out to cairo to consult with egyptian president mohammed morsi at the center of the efforts to bring durable cease-fire. the violence in gaza was jeff shadowing president obama's trip to asia, which was supposed to be a calm sw
be able to do this. bear in mind, this is not the egypt of hosey you in barrack. the egyptian government now are muzz lum brotherhood, and israel is in a less-tenable negotiating position and they remain military strong but do they want to go in on the ground take hundreds of thousands of casualties? that they've within boehnered will cause them to lose the international support they have. it's one of those 50-50 chance things but it's looking like everybody is looking fair way out. the question is, in a region like this, is there a way out. >> schieffer: well allen pizzey, who always shows up in the worst place where's the workforce things are going on, thank you. cbs news correspondent charlie dag tais on the other side of the border in gaza. charlie, bring us up to speed. what is the situation like there. >> reporter: well, the mood here is extremely teps, and the biggest worry is this dangerous and unpredictable situation may be about to get worse. as we drove through the northern part gaza strip, we were shown a couple of bombed out buildings, and one looked to be three or four stor
in the days ahead. president obama also spoke last night with egypt president mohamed morsi about working together to preserve peace and security in the region. tension between israel and egypt's new islamist government has increased since the attacks with egypt recalling its ambassador to israel in protest. richard haass, also an emergency meeting of the u.n. security council last night. sift through this for us. how big is this? how significant is this in the middle east right now? >> well, it's big for lots of reasons, because it's not happening in isolation. one is you have the largest military clashes between israel and hamas in, what, four year now, and it's not going to stop. at times it doesn't matter in the middle east exactly why things begin. over the last few months there have been hundreds of rocket attacks, now this, then retaliation. it just happens. second of all, it's happening in the absence of anything political. there's no dialogue going on whatsoever between israelis and palestinians. this can't substitute for this. thirdly, egyptians withdrew their ambassador. since
to "early start." today a very important day in the middle east. particularly in egypt. delegations from both israel and hamas are in cairo to meet separately with representatives from egypt to advance the cease-fire talks. and, as we mentioned this is all happening as israel's defense minister ehud barak announced he is resigning his post. that's just happening. meanwhile egypt internally embroiled by president mohamed morsi's move late last week granting really extraordinary powers. critics have called it an undemocratic power grab. today morsi meets with egypt's highest judicial body which has denounced his action. we're going to go now to matthew chance who is in london. good morning, matthew. i want to start with the news that really just happened. israel's defense minister ehud barak finishing up a press conference, announcing that he is resigning come january. any sense of whythis move is happening, and what next for ehud barak? he's really been a central key figure in israel for decades. >> yes, he certainly has. i don't think there's a great deal of surprise in this announcement
. we've been talking on this show the last few days about how the nation of egypt is really the key connection for the united states to both sides in the fight right now. and that was driven home today by the fact that when the cease-fire was announced, it was announced by u.s. secretary of state hillary clinton, and egypt's foreign minister at a press conference in egypt. >> in the days ahead, the united states will work with partners across the region to consolidate this progress, improve conditions for the people of gaza, provide security for the people of israel. ultimately, every step must move us toward a comprehensive peace, for all the people of the region. >> the leader of hamas held his own press conference in cairo today, during which he said that while his side agrees to the cease-fire, his fighters have, quote, their hands on the trigger. in jerusalem, the israeli prime minister, benjamin net ya yan hew, also spoke about the cease-fire agreement. look at this. "prime minister benjamin netanyahu this evening spoke with u.s. president barack obama and acceded to his recom
, the muslim brotherhood in egypt, to leverage that possibility. israel. israel has been watching for the last six to nine months hamas bringing in longer and longer range missiles from iran. i think they saw this as an opportunity of necessity to take those out, missiles that can now hit tel aviv and jerusalem. egypt. this is a real problem for egypt. you have a new government there that needs money from the united states. they don't want to be caught in a struggle between israel and the palestinians. for iran, this is a godsend. it takes world attention off their nuclear program and puts pressure on all the more moderate forces in the arab world, puts them at the head. and lastly, syria, couldn't be a better day for bashar al assad. takes all the attention officer ya. no one is looking at the murderous campaign of assad against his own people. >> andrea mitchell, the diplomacy for president obama about to start a second term with all of the problems in the middle east. he's in bangkok this morning. he talked about his support for israel. >> there's no country on earth that would tolerate mis
we should be thankful for when it comes to the political world. and egypt's muslim brotherhood. the cease-fire deal betweend evf israel and hamas. we have that coming up next. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. >> more breaking news and developing stories on a brand-new hour on "happening now." >> a new holiday spending bonanza. americans are feeling more confident about our economy. will lead to the great of growth, and what could set us back? >> also, an arrest in a string of murders in new york city connected to one gunman. what we are learning about the man that police in new york city say was poised to strike again. and a large bird crashes through the cockpit plane of this airport. details of the scare in the air for the pilot and passengers. it's all "happening now." >> but first, the cease-fire truce may be fragile, but it appeals to be holding. i am heather childers in for jenna lee. >> and i am rick scott in for jon scott. with egypt's president mohammed mo
the situation will get worse before it gets better. one thing nbc has confirmed is egypt's prime minister will make an unprecedented visit to the gaza strip on friday. he's leading a high delegation of cabinet officials to mediate and perhaps broker a truce between the israelis and palestinians but more importantly to express solidarity with the people of gaza who he says are now subject to israeli aggression. >> let me bring in nbc's martin fletcher in tel aviv. martin, senior u.s. officials told nbc news to expect more from israel later today. can you add to that information? >> reporter: well, yeah, the israelis are making it as clear as they possibly can they will do anything it takes to stop the palestinian attacks on israel and to make the southern cities of israel secure. the defense minister said today and he emphasized this, and we will do anything, and i repeat anything to keep those cities secure. the israelis are emphasizing repeatedly from different sources they'll do whatever it takes. when the americans warn that israel will do more this evening, they're echoing what the is
electedded muslim brotherhood leader of egypt is facing the same kind of revolt some would say in the streets. we'll keep a close eye on live developments in cairo. our thanks to steve harrigan, just several feet above that scene right now. bill: that is breaking and developing overseas. also back at home we're only minutes away from susan rice and her arrival on the hill. show you a live look where we expect the ambassador to arrive. she will sit down with her harshest critics who say she misled the american people on the attack in libya. we'll get reaction from the man who used to hold her job, former u.n. ambassador to the u.n., john bolton, is our guest next martha: all right. we've got a fox news alert because it is 9:30 on the east coast and there is senator kelly ayotte as she walks into a very important meeting this morning after a couple of months of controversy over this u.s. ambassador susan rice is about to face her toughest republican critics on benghazi. this is a live shot on the interiors and escalators of capitol hill this morning. ambassador rice will sit down with senators
regarding that anti-islamic film. there had been rioting in egypt and of course, this is the contradictory thread of the narrative here, that it was riots that -- in egypt that led to the attack on the embassy in libya on the consulate in libya. so he's going to talk about having these two threads of information but his sense right from the start that it was a terrorist attack by answar al sharia. a pretty murky group, loose collection of characters. >> this is interesting to me. just to be clear, your source is saying general petraeus knew almost immediately or felt that it was a terrorist attack, knew the group involved, even though he told members of congress three days after the attack that it could have been spontaneous and there's also the statement made by the director of national intelligence on the dni the end of october who put out a statement saying in the wake of criticism of ambassador rice, saying that early reports indicated it might have been linked to -- might have been a spontaneous demonstration and ambassador rice went out on sunday saying -- five days after, saying it
guarantee you that many people here in egypt and israel are intent on following that press conference. unlike yesterday, there have been no dramatic statements that a cease-fire will be declared at such and such a time. today it's more the reality of both sides, israel and hamas, getting bogged down in details. apparently, at least according to egyptian sources, they haven't yet been able to bridge differences. it's really unclear whether secretary clinton is carrying any specific proposals or if is she's here basically to nudge both sides into some kind of a compromise. but her presence here does give both sides the respected international i'd say political heavyweight to talk to, which certainly can't hurt. according to egyptian sources again, the main sticking point as we understand it seems to be over hamas' key demand, and it's not a surprising one, that that six-year-old blockade of gaza be lifted when the truce goes into effect. israel is balking at that. it reportedly is saying while it agrees with the principle of lifting the siege eventually, it does not agree with the timin
into israel. hamas says the can conflict caused $1.2 billion to the economy. >>> in egypt, dueling rallies are planned. police and protesters are planned at tahrir square. jim maceda is live in cairo. can you put a perspective on this? i understand there are going to be demonstrations from both sides. >> that's absolutely right. i'll tell you, alex, you won't see many of them down below me here in tahrir square, nor will you see them throwing rocks at the police. but the average egyptians, since there's no polling on this, they are just as worried and angry about what morsi has done. morsi in putting his own will, his own voice above the wall, that he's, in fact, snuffing out the will of the people and all those other voices of egyptians who are not muslim brotherhood. many egyptians were killed down below and up to 11 thour,000, i understand, wounded since the uprising, did that in order that people's voices would be heard and reckoned with and they are angry that his camp is in a very brazen way trying to silence that. morsi's decrees, they say, feel they are a sign of times to come. it
request. egypt has recalled the ambassador to israel following the killing of a top hamas leader. the palestinian authority isialing the u.n. to condemn what it calls illegal criminal actions. israel says it's just defending itself and will do it again if necessary. leland vittert reports from jerusalem. >> from an israeli drone you can see the car of hamas' military commander driving along a quiet street in gaza city. the missile appeared to come out of nowhere. he didn't have a chance. his car burped to a shell. within hours the israeli air strike killed two more senior hamas militants and destroyed major weapon store ran facility. the assassination marked the start of operation pillar of cloud against hamas and islamic jihad in response to a week of militant rockets launched in southern israel. and the missile attack of an army jeep as shown in this video provided by the attacke attackers. at a press conference israel's prime minister promised "anything needed to defend our citizens." he continued we are ready to bring in more forces if needed. alluding to a ground defense tha
to a ground offensive and egypt is warning israel to back off. we'll have a live report from the israel-gaza border. and talks aimed at avoiding the fiscal cliff were held between leaders. we'll get reactions from all sides. special report at washington starts at 6 eastern. now, back to new york and "the five." ♪ >> love the doobie brothers. right now, we're seeing republicans argue why they lost the election and over disarray, not me, i never confused debate with fractionalism and lock step with unity. the goal is to pick apart the message, but most americans agree with that. and so we live in a country that dislikes leftism, why did we loose, to be cool, and a fear of dorkiness, and i call this dork-aphobia, and every time you use the term, i get a back massage. why he got elected obama is cool and the other guy wasn't. and those who look to politics every four years, and if there were an easier way to elect a candidate. >> oh, my god, oh! ahh! oh! oh, my god!! that was done in canada. so the job was a reverse d duopoly. how dorky it is to be a country divided by race and gender, s
as egypt takes the lead. [ male announcer ] introducing the new dell xps 12. part of a whole new line of tablets from dell. it's changing the conversation. ♪ >>> welcome back, everyone. i'm alex witt. some of the stories making headline on thanksgiving day. a new study in the new england journal of medicine claims routine use of mammograms may have led to 1.3 million women being incorrectly diagnosed or overdiagnosed with breast cancer in the past 30 years. the latest study cast skepticism on the effectiveness of the test. one-third of women diagnosed with breast cancer would not have developed the full-blown disease if left untreated. >>> two weeks after winning his tenth term in congress, jesse jackson jr. resigned. jackson cited his ongoing treatment for bipolar disorder and admitted to, quote, my share of mistakes. jackson's resignation amid a committee vegs into dealings with impressined former governor blah voi given. >>> the violence in syria continues. rebel leaders say 40 people killed in an air strike on a key hospital in the city of aleppo. this is not the first time the
been in that direction. you think what happened the same day in egypt, it apparently was still spontaneous, and that's what our best intelligence says. if you think to the demonstrations in afghanistan over the years when the korans were burned or the prophet was insulted, that was often the span spontaneous. the same thing when the danes published that cartoon with the prophet mohammed, and there were demonstrations throughout the muslim world. it was not an unreasonable initial assumption. i do believe that someone in the administration, not in the campaign, but in the administration probably could have done a better job between wednesday and sunday of getting better talking points. but i don't think it was ambassador rice's fault. i definitely don't think she lied. >> if it came through the white house, then she didn't give a straight story. anyway, joe leeb lieberman, who's fascinating to watch because you never know which way he's going to go. he's usually a faithful ally of mccain and graham, but this afternoon joe lieberman came to a far different conclusion. take a list
for life. only from aveeno. egypt's tahrir square. they say that they are going to stay there until mohamed morsi gave back the powers that he took himself days ago. liberates and moderates feel that he's trying to push the democracy back into dictatorship. president morsi says it will remain this way until the constitution is finalized. i want to bring in reza sayeh. first of all, give us a feeling of what is happening on the streets and how people feel about where they are in this. >> reporter: well, protesters are still here, nowhere near the numbers of the 1 million demonstration last night. but we have a whole bunch of other collision courses taking shape, suzanne, that could complicate this. here's why. president morsi wants the new constitution drafted immediately. 100-member panel has been designed to write this new constitution but there's been a whole lot of problems and conflict. the panel is dominated by supporters of the muslim brotherhood, islamists. many liberal members have quit and protested. >> reza, we have breaking news. senator bob corker, a republican from tennessee re
there in the middle east. you've got syria, the iranian nuclear thing, the constitutional struggle with an egypt. you potentially have jordan getting in the mix. plus you've now got the oldest of the issues, the israel israeli/palestinian issue. this is facing barack obama at a time he wants to do more in asia, deal with the fiscal cliff. welcome to your second term. >> a lot to do. richard haa ss. >> how did jerry adams do it? how did the irish terrorists as they were called before the peace deal, how did they not only enforce the peace but then turn to their own bad elements and say, step out of line, and we're going to crush you. >> one was, they couldn't shoot their way to power. tony blair, the irish prime minister gave them a political path that was legitimate. there was a potential there for compromise. they had discipline in their own ranks. >> how did they do that? how would hamas discipline the extremists? >> at some point -- listen, in the history of every opposition movement, there's a time when there's a civil war where people who want to compromise have to deal with the radicals who don
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)